Bell Helicopter Textron Inc.

 

A Subsidiary of Textron, Inc.

 

Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. (BELL) is the owner of the copyrights on all of the
technical data and information developed to maintain its rotorcraft, and as
such, protects its exclusive right to reproduce, adapt, and publicly distribute
this information.

 

Technical service information licensing is the process by which BELL will make
available the right to use the intellectual property we have developed to
maintain and repair our aircraft. These licensing rights are available to
responsible companies for a specified amount and for a
defined period of time.
 

The primary type of technical service information and data licensed by BELL is
the proprietary knowledge we have developed for use by BELL owners and operators to service and maintain their rotorcraft.

Most of this information has been produced in print, photographic, video, and
audio formats, but increasingly, this material will be provided in high-tech
electronic formats including floppy diskettes, CD-ROMS, DVD, magnetic tape,
Internet and other user-friendly mediums. All of these products contain the
statement,  PROPRIETARY RIGHTS NOTICE These data are proprietary to Bell Helicopter
Textron Inc. Disclosure, reproduction, or use of these data for any other purpose other than helicopter operation
and/or maintenance is forbidden without prior written authorization from Bell Helicopter Textron Inc.

 

The relationship we maintain with our licensees is very important. Licensees pay for the right to use BELL intellectual property. Those who are not licensees and who use, copy, or distribute this information will be subject to legal sanctions and remedies.
 

For this reason BELL will: 1) vigorously enforce copyright protection, and if
necessary litigate against infringers, 2) follow up on reports of infringement
received from licensees and others concerned about the integrity of BELL
information, 3) notify infringers of their legal obligations with respect to
licensing, and 4) educate potential users of materials about their legal
obligations with respect to licensing.

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

 

1. Why was my auction ended?
 

Your auction was ended because it infringed upon BELL,
trademarks, trade dress or copyrights (intellectual property rights). BELL has
the responsibility and the right to protect its trademarks, trade dress and
copyrights. BELL representatives monitor sales on eBay and other retail venues
to ensure that BELL intellectual property rights are not infringed. Examples
of such infringement include, but are not limited to: Trademarks - any
unauthorized use of a registered trademark or a common law trademark owned by
BELL, such as items using the BELL dependable airframe name (word marks) or
"Huey II" or "EagleEye" etc. logo on products not produced by BELL
or licensed for production by BELL, is trademark infringement. Trade Dress -
any item that copies the overall shape, profile and unique appearance of BELL
Products; for example, copying the appearance of a BELL airframe is trade dress
infringement. Copyrights - unauthorized copies of printed materials, such as
overhaul / maintenance manuals are copyright infringements.
 
 

2. Why can't I sell a single unauthorized item?
 

BELL has spent considerable time, money, and effort
developing products, its reputation and goodwill through the marketing of its
products the BELL brand and many of its product marks and designs are now
famous. Sellers of unauthorized items who attempt to make money using the BELL
name, marks and product designs or the appearance of BELL product designs, are
attempting to transact business based on the company acquired
distinctiveness, goodwill and reputation. The apparent association with
products not made by BELL or licensed by BELL for manufacture damage the
company reputation and can cause confusion about the origin of these other
goods.
 

3. Can I list the item if I don't use the name BELL?
 

No. Even if the item does not say BELL or another name
owned by BELL, the distinctive look (trade dress) and design of the BELL
rotorcraft and/or logo might not be copied it is infringement.

 

4. Can I list the item if I say it a replica or copy or
model?
 

No. A disclaimer about the goods offered for sale, such as
"copy" or "replica" or "model" does not protect
an infringing sale from state and federal law regarding the sale of infringing
or counterfeit items.
 

5. Why are others allowed to sell these items?
 

No one is allowed to sell copyrighted, trademarked or
trade dress infringing items without a license from the manufacturer. While we
make efforts to police the marketplace, some infringing items may be missed.
You are not being singled out. All manufacturers and sellers of infringing
items that BELL is aware of or becomes aware of are put on notice of BELL
intellectual property rights and pursued if they do not stop infringing.
 

6. What will happen if I re-list the item?
 

In the short term, you will be suspended from eBay. In the
long term, if you do not obey the law and you re-list items, you may be seen as
willfully breaking the law and you will subject yourself to civil and possibly
criminal liability for your continued infringement and the consequences of your
continued infringement. BELL proactively protects its intellectual property
rights.
 

7. I purchased the item legitimately, why can't I re-sell
it?

 

As mentioned above, infringing products may at times be
offered for sale, and innocent purchasers may unknowingly buy infringing
products. Nevertheless, the existence and sale of such products is still
considered infringement. If you sell an infringing product, you have infringed
BELL intellectual property rights whether you meant to infringe or not.
 

8. What if I didn't know I couldn't list the item?
 

Ignorance of the law is not a defense or excuse to
copyright and trademark or trade dress infringement. Now that your auction has
been ended, you are on notice that the item you attempted to sell is
unauthorized. Subsequent listings of such items increase the risk that BELL will
pursue the protection of its intellectual property rights against you.